Classic Film Spotlight: Scrooge (1970)

A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies

There are a few renditions of A Christmas Carol that are incredible to watch like Scrooge (1935) and Scrooge (1951) because they have an amazing cast of actors. Scrooge (1970) is my absolute favorite version of Scrooge because not only does it have all the incredible acting and story telling that the first two renditions have but with this film version they added music, dance, songs, and even a catchy parlor game. 

Scrooge (1970) stars Albert Finney as Ebenezer Scrooge, Alec Guinness as Jacob Marley, Edith Evans as the Ghost of Christmas Past, Kenneth More as the jovial Ghost of Christmas Present, Laurence Naismith as Mr. Fezziwig, and Anton Rodgers as the unforgettable Tom Jenkins. 

The story begins with Scrooge being his old miser self when suddenly at night he is awakened by three ghosts. Each ghost of the past, present, and future shows him what he is missing in his life, why he is the way he is, and the untapped happiness that awaits him if he turns over a new leaf. What makes this story more unique than the others is that the cast sing, dance, and act their way through the film making the viewer feel as though they too are on a unexpected adventure with Ebenezer Scrooge.

There are quite a few scenes in the film that are unique for a retelling of A Christmas Carol. You have Marley's personal hell filled with fire and brimstone, Marley flying high with his chains attached to him (Alec Guinness actually injured himself on that), a session of A Minister's Cat game which was a popular parlor game of the time, the Ghost of Christmas Present singing a uplifting song called "I Like Life", and a  bittersweet flashback of Scrooge's romance with his old boss Mr. Fezziwig's daughter. There is even an incredible song that is performed twice for two separate scenes called "Thank You Very Much". Watching the performances in this film is like watching a Broadway show come to life.

What also makes this rendition of Scrooge so unique is that Albert Finney plays himself both young and old. They aged him up to play Ebenezer Scrooge even though he was only 34 years old at the time. His performance is the most heartbreaking and uplifting I have even seen on film. 

This retelling of the Dickens classic tale of redemption is bursting with song and dance. The joy found in this film is unmistakable and connects to people of all ages. I started showing my children this film on Christmas Eve a few years ago and it is now a tradition they really look forward to experiencing every year. 

Have you seen this version of Scrooge? Have you had the chance to the watch the 1935 and 1951 film versions?

A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies
A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies
A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies
A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies
A Vintage Nerd, Scrooge 1970, Classic Holiday Movies, Classic Film Blog,  Classic Christmas Movies

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